Vol 3-1 Original Research Article

Psychological Impact of Skin Disorders on Patients’ Self-esteem and Perceived Social Support

Charalambos Costeris1,*, Maria Petridou2, Yianna Ioannou1

1School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Department of Social Sciences, University of Nicosia, Cyprus

2Department of Psychology University of Cyprus

Background: At early developmental stages, patients’ sense of self develops under the influence of dermatological disorders and can affect how young patients perceive themselves, as well as the way they interact with those around them. Objective: To investigate the influence of dermatological disorders on self-esteem and perceived social support in two groups of patients with severe visible facial acne and with non-visible psoriasis/eczema. Design: The study engaged patients during their visit to the Dermatologist to seek treatment (prior to dermatological treatment phase), and at a six-month follow-up, when their treatment was completed (post-dermatological phase). Setting: Patients from two Cypriot cities were diagnosed with acne, psoriasis/eczema by their Dermatologists and were encouraged to participate in the study. Participants: 162 adult participants (18-35 years) took part in the study (n = 54 patients with severe visible facial cystic acne; n = 54 patients with non visible psoriasis and eczema; and n = 54 participants without dermatological disorder - control group). Measurements: A sociodemographic questionnaire was administered to all participants. The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and the Interpersonal Support Evaluation List (ISEL-40) were administered prior to and at post-dermatological treatment phase. Results: All dermatological patients showed lower self-esteem and lower perceived social support, compared to the control group. Moreover, patients with acne appeared to have lower levels of self-esteem and perceived social support at both research phases and in comparison with the other groups. Conclusion: Patients’ self-esteem and perceived social support need to be psychologically evaluated before dermatological treatment, as well as after its completion. Findings suggest a comprehensive psychological support during the course of dermatology treatment.

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Vol 3-1 Mini Review Article

Minireview on Highly Stretchable Hydrogels for Wound Healing Applications

Peter Sweeney, Kyle Vaughn, Hai-Feng Ji*

Department of Chemistry, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA

Hydrogels show great potential as biocompatible materials with a wide variety of applications. This includes, but is not limited to, wound dressings, signal detection, tissue repair, and adhesives. This minireview focuses on the recent development of highly stretchable hydrogels for wound healing applications. The hydrogels reviewed display high elasticity and self-healing properties that increase their longevity when in use.

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Vol 3-1 Mini Review Article

Skin Health Properties of Lycopene and Melatonin

Lourdes Franco1*, Ana M Marchena2, Ana B Rodríguez2

1Department of Physiology (Neuroimmunophysiology and Chrononutrition Research Group), Faculty of Medicine, University of Extremadura, Badajoz, Spain.

2Department of Physiology (Neuroimmunophysiology and Chrononutrition Research Group), Faculty of Science, University of Extremadura, Badajoz, Spain.

Skin plays an important role in the protection of our body. It can be damaged by environmental factors, and it suffers from progressive morphological and physiological disorders with time. Melatonin and Lycopene have a lot of properties which protect our skin. In this review, we have investigated about how these substances can help to prevent damage and repair the skin.

DOI: 10.29245/2767-5092/2021/1.1126 View / Download Pdf
Vol 3-1 Case Report

Long Term Skeletal Changes in a Young Woman Treated with Isotretinoin

Mónica Ibáñez Barceló1*, Antonia Teresa Vila Mas2, Ana Estremera Rodrigo3, Antonio Juan Mas1

1Rheumatology Department, Hospital Son Llàtzer, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

2Dermatology Department, Hospital Son Llàtzer, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

3Radiology Department, Hospital Son Llàtzer, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

DOI: 10.29245/2767-5092/2021/1.1128 View / Download Pdf
Vol 3-1 Mini Review Article

Mechanobiology of Skin

Michael Sheetz

Welch Chair of Biochemisty, Molecular Mechanomedicine Program, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555, USA

Although there is a general appreciation of the mechanical abilities of cells in creating the forms in nature, we understand relatively little about how the mechanobiology of cells can affect behavior. Recent studies of the effects of mechanical activity indicate that exercise and other physical perturbations can inhibit cancer progression and performance loss in aging. Thus, the tumor cell and senescent cell states are mechanically different from normal cells. New tools to measure cellular forces and the downstream biochemical changes that result from mechanical signaling have enabled the description of the matrix rigidity sensor that is missing in the vast majority of tumor cells. Tumor cells no longer form tumors upon its restoration; whereas normal cells have unregulated growth when the sensor is depleted. Further, mechanical strain of tumor cells will cause apoptosis and may have effects on keratinocyte and melanocyte tumors. This could explain some of the anti-tumor benefits of physical activity. In the case of aging, the negative effects of senescent cells on their neighbors appear to be reversed by small but not large mechanical strains in skin. Thus, cells in the tumor or senescent states respond specifically to mechanical perturbations and a deeper understanding of the important aspects of mechanobiology can be used in therapies to augment biochemical therapies to benefit the patient.

DOI: 10.29245/2767-5092/2021/1.1132 View / Download Pdf